Spring 2016 Senior Essays and Schedule

2016 Senior Essays and Schedule

All faculty and students are welcome to attend any of the senior essay seminars. Assigned faculty and student readers can download a copy of an essay here by clicking on its title.

Click here for a schedule calendar; there will no doubt be some adjustments, so check often for updates. Please notify Tutor Michael Riley right away of any problems.

Reuben Delay

 All men by nature, as you have probably read, desire to know. This essay focuses on discussion-based learning and how, through conversation, we can arrive at greater knowledge. When we engage in conversation our interaction, as with our learning, benefits from friendship. Aristotle’s exploration of friendship will compliment the analogies present in Plato’s Republic regarding the dialectic method. This essay will demonstrate why friendship is the ideal environment for discussion-based learning.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Tsukahara
TBD
TBD
Fri. 4/8 3:30
Dante 203
Aracely Maravilla

What The Hill Does Tom Know?

An essay concerning Tom Jones and the Man of the Hill, and how human nature plays a role in the paths we take in life.

I will be analyzing the Man of the Hill, using Rousseau's "A Discourse on Inequality", and Tom Jones to try to determine what, in their natures, led them on the paths they have taken. Hopefully this paper will answer the question "Why did Tom Jones not end up like the Man of the Hill?"

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Martinez
TBD
 TBD
Wed. 4/13
2:40
Dante 203
Aly Runke

Platopia: The Republic and Why it isn't Socrate's Eden

Mankind seeks perfection. It is pattern consistent in philosophers the world over- the perfect soul, the perfect definitions, the perfect society. In Plato's Republic one sees the constitution of the perfect city, but is that really so? Instead could the Republic be a parody of humanity's unconscious desire for perfection to warn against corruption and to outline true Justice through such parody and a dystopian society painted as utopia. This essay will explore the true motives of Plato's Republic by outlining the city as a dystopia on and pulling the lessons truly hidden its construction for the reader.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Riley
Tsukahara
 
Wed. 4/13 4:10
Dante 203
Jenni Chavez
 
 
What is love? A dynamic emotion that molds the world around us and paves the paths we lead, love is complex, protean, and multifaceted. How does love affect us? Love can be a source of fulfillment, of happiness, of unbridled joy. However, love can also be the source of sinister plots, an insidious desire for domination, and the unraveling of an individual’s reason. This essay endeavors to examine the characterization of love and the effects of love on the characters of Racine’s Phédre. Within these pages, we shall investigate love’s role in human tragedy.
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Martinez
TBD
 
Fri, 4/15 3:30
Dante 203
Shane McCarthy

The Rewards of Injustice: The Justice of Inversion in Dante's Inferno

Dante’s Inferno is both an epic story and shocking theological journey, but how do we understand the possible contradictions of his framing of justice with his punishments of inversion? What is inversion and how does he use it? What is its significance? What message is he conveying to us, and what do we learn about the nature of evil actions? We will piece together Dante’s designs, and walk with him as he witnesses the heart of darkness to learn what it truly is. 

(Updated 4/13/2016)

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Hamm
TBD
Wed. 4/20 3:30
Dante 203
Meg Birgen

 Medea and Othello: Subversions of Aristotle's Archetypal Tragic Heroes

What makes the archetypal tragic hero according to Aristotle’s Poetics? How does the poet subvert this archetype to manifest their characters’ disadvantaged place in society? Using Euripides’ Medea and Shakespeare’s Othello as examples, I will explore the inadequacies of Aristotle’s definition of the tragic hero. I then conclude by proposing my own definition.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Cobeen
TBD
Fri 4 22 3:30
Dante 203
Zoë de Lellis

The Journey to Redemption: An Examination of the Relationships in Goethe's Faust

A perfect mirror shows a perfect image of what it reflects. When a person looks in a mirror they see themselves clearly, but they see a reflected image and so when viewing themselves as others see them, as in photos, they may think themselves partially unrecognizable, as they are not used to seeing the image this way. In Goethe’s play, Faust, Goethe uses characters that mirror each other to bring up the question of whether Faust is a good person. This essay will look at the relationships in Faust and use them to examine Faust’s journey to redemption. 

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Pihas
TBD
Wed. 4/27 3:30
Dante 203
Callie Camper

From Knowledge to Wisdom: the Journey to a Personal Relationship with God

The search for God began as a search for natural knowledge. Mythology was replaced by philosophy as opinion concerning the natural world transformed into knowledge concerning the unlimited and transcendent. As pagan philosophy was replaced by Christian philosophy, the search for knowledge of a higher realm focused its inquiries into a search for God at a personal level. How did we evolve from an impersonal knowledge of an detached creator to an individual and personal wisdom in God? This essay will explore texts from Plato, Plotinus, and Saint Augustine in the search to find out what it means to have knowledge and wisdom in God. 

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Pihas
TBD
Mon. 5/9 4:30
Galileo 214
Jon Gumz

Character Indentification: A Guide to Yourself

How do readers identify with a character in a narrative? Is there any value in identification? These are the two questions I attempt to answer in my essay. I use two methods for recreating identification; in hopes of creating the opportunity to experience identification with a character, or to induce a recollection of a character previously identified with. My attempt focuses on two characters; Aeneas from Virgil’s Aeneid and Prince Andrew in Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. After examination and evaluation of my two methods, I present the significance of identification: both for myself, and for readers.

 Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:

Cardwell
Smith
Mon. 5/2
 3:30
Galileo 214

Henry Hall

The Way of the One

What theories could Lao Tzu and Plotinus possibly have in common? The two lived 800 years apart, Lao Tzu in China and Plotinus in Rome. Plotinus seeks unity with the source of existence namely, "The One," while Lao Tzu pursues the motion of existence namely, "the way." In their pursuit to understand the Universe and its source, Lao Tzu and Plotinus face a common paradox: division to produce relation is the condition for knowledge, while it is also the condition that renders knowledge of the whole, as the whole, impossible. The two have their own distinct methods of working with this paradox to understand the whole. Given the common scope and difficulties of the two theories, we explore the possibility of merging Lao Tzu's and Plotinus' respective theories.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Cortright
TBD
Fri  5/6 1:30
Galileo 210B
Erica Rohach

I Fear The Versed

 “That which produces an effect well must also produce it, but that which merely produces a given effect does not necessarily produce it well.” ~ Aristotle, on Rohach’s I Fear the Versed

Ahh, the annual poetry thesis! You know the type to which I refer. A senior in the Integral Program, starved for a topic or too long comfortable resting on the conclusion “I know that I know nothing,” turns to flowery ode or sonnet to seek answers about the meaning of life. Rohach, with an eye to the work of the crusty old Roman, Lucretius, will attempt to show what poetry really is: a sham. Using a rickety rope bridge of evidence, she will struggle to prove that fluff and trickery alone lie beneath the “beauty” of verse.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
Tues. 4/26 4:00
Galileo 210b
Amanda Muña

An Inquiry into the Condition of Man

Consider your life. Done? Good. Now — any questions? If the answer is yes (like many others before you), congratulations! You have entered the game. Around us there exists a world full of answers, but none that answer the singular, perpetual question of our existence: “Why?” Through an examination of Pascal’s Pensees, we the readers attempt to discover any truth we can regarding our fundamental contradictions, our reason and heart, and ultimately, the human condition itself. What we find is an amazing complexity that we could never understand; and yet we live it every day. So go on, give it a read. After all, you are already playing.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
Tues. 5/3 4:00
Galileo 210b
Henry Ward

Philosophical Fools: An Examination of Materialism in Denis Diderot's Rameau's Nephew

No comedy is complete without a fool; every Spongebob needs a Patrick, every Quixote needs a Sancho Panza. This essay examines the role of the Fool as a device, and explores the Fool's usefulness to literature: using Denis Diderot's Rameau's Nephew as a means of investigating the Fool. Diderot will demonstrate how fools are linked to the philosophy of materialism and cynicism, and how, by association, people consumed by either materialism or cynicism are simply foolish.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Yribarren
TBD
Wed. 5/11 3:30
Dante 203

 

Spring 2017 Senior Essays and Schedule

2017 Senior Essays and Schedule

All faculty and students are welcome to attend any of the senior essay seminars. Assigned faculty and student readers can download a copy of an essay (when they become available) here by clicking on its title.

Click here for a schedule calendar; there will no doubt be some adjustments, so check often for updates. Please notify Tutor Felicia Martinez right away of any problems.

Jack
Brook

Don Quixote's Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
( Cervantes, James, Pascal)
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Martinez
Riley
May 9
3pm
D203
Cirenna
Dao
The Waiting Game. The Connection Between Human Nature and Faith.
Man's wretched human nature is the pinnacle of my thesis, along with understanding how reason and faith all come together to either save man's natural inclinations or not? By looking at the works from Pascal and Montaigne, I have gone through and established the importance of having faith in one's life and if that is enough to help save man's human nature.
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Hamm
TBD
May 17
1pm
D203
Jack
Iles

Education, Sophistry, and the Polis, according to Plato and Hume

A thesis in which Iles tries to subtly––or not so subtly, depending on your reading––push his political agenda by placing traditional values and education over both positivism and deconstructionism by accusing the two of being silly sophistry; all the while trying to avoid explicit names and examples, but instead relying on two smart dead people to give weight to his argument, while also trying to avoid falling into casual nationalism

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Cardwell
Zepeda
April 25
3pm
D203
Nicholas
Johnson

The Legacy of Euclid

 

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Smith
Hamm
April 19
1pm
D203
Alejandro
Kerrigan
Missing the Marx?: A retrospective into states of nature, an exploration of exploitation, and questions for our future

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Tsukahara
TBD
May19
1pm
D216
John
Konevich

Nature Leaving Nature: The Journey of Man

My thesis is examine Rousseau's discourse on Inequality and Social Contract. It's aim is to track man from savage beast to societal being, how we got there and what pushed man out of nature. It concludes with how our human nature is tied to government and what is the best way to create a government according to our nature.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Pihas
TBD
May 5
1pm
D216
Dustin
Linck

On the Origin of Resolutions: An essay concerning the evolution of labor, and our American labor consciousness--individual and social

A proper analysis--of our ignorant, consumptive policies, of our purpose (or excuse) for having them, and, ultimately, of the development of our consciousness--has shown the need for original, conscious synthesis: of freedom and liberty, the reason for them, the virtue in them, and, most certainly, of our expenditures of energy. Further, since this analysis has naturally presupposed a certain need that we have categorically ignored, we know that this ignorance keeps us from successfully struggling with our problems together, i.e. ignorance keeps us from consciously synthesizing together our individual analyses. If we could remember this fact, then this would be a relative, synthetic resolution (found in future conversations) of our American problems.

"I highly recommend watching Michael Pollan's Cooked on Netflix before 1pm on May 3rd, 2017"

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
May 3
1pm
D203
James
Maynard
The Evolutionary Tendencies of the Human Aesthetic

Good evening fellow intelligizers of the absolute! I hope you have saved your appetites for the dialectical discourse we are soon to be engaged in. The question I pose to you, my fellow readers, is what capacity does the human species have for evolution? Since the birth of the human race in the natural world, what have been our evolutionary tendencies? Now I understand that this line of inquiry seems rather dull and dry. Why bother wasting time over a regurgitation of Darwinian Theory and various social contracts? Please do give your host a little more credit than that! Although I am but a novice, I do understand how to treat my guests. For now, however, I simply extend the invitation. If you are human, and believe yourself in possession of the great capacity of Logos, this meal may suit your taste. I cannot promise any satisfaction will last - for the philosophic mind is a hungry one.  But as it stands, come and stay for our evening of debauchery. Enjoy the light air, and maybe have a drink – but do gain the courage to go and dance in the nighttime music. Soon our most honored guest will arrive, and our meal shall begin.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
May 12
1pm
D216
Alexander
Otto

Phaedrus: The Soul Discovering Truth

Mr. Otto covers the story of the Phaedrus and the purpose of myth in reality. The myth in question is the chariot, and this represents the soul, the origin of the soul, and the spiritual fulfillment of the soul.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Riley
TBD
May 2
3pm
D203
Gabrielle
Patterson
I 'Kant' Believe It's Not Science! An Explanation of the Metaphysician's Self-Abuse in the Pursuit of Truth
Every few years, a senior is stupid enough to write on Kant. This year, I am that senior. Everybody is likely thinking one of two things.
1: I hate Kant and I barely understood what he was saying when I read the Critique of Pure Reason, so there is no chance that I am going to that seminar.
2. I've never read Kant and have only heard scary things about him, so I am for sure going to avoid that thesis.
To these perfectly justified thoughts, I only issue a disclaimer: My mom, who has never read Kant, or anything like him, read my thesis and was able to understand it. So don't be afraid! I wrote it so that everybody can and should be able to read and understand it.
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Cortright
Hamm
May 10
1pm
D203
Andrew
Penman
"Emperors In Mirrors Are Smaller Than They Appear"

Is Tolstoy correct in asserting that "a king is history's slave?" Is he right about how history works?

Tolstoy’s War and Peace

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Riley
Smith
April 21
1pm
D216
Kathryn
Price
Could We Be Wrong? An Exploration into Mathematical Truths, First Principles, Where We Were Wrong, and How We Could Be Wrong Again.

The Great Books Program incorporates mathematical and scientific theories from a wide variety of marvelous thinkers, some of which contradict. From Ptolemy to Copernicus to Newton to Einstein, there seems to be an ever changing understanding of our world and reality. But what if our discovery is not yet finished when it comes to our comprehension of mathematics and physics? Could we be wrong about concepts we believe to be evident? These are the questions considered in this thesis. So if an exploration into mathematical truth sounds like a good read, you’ve come to the right place. And if not, still read it.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Smith
Martinez
May 16
3pm
D203
Dimitri
Quaglierini

“On Becoming a Monster: A Psychoanalytic Understanding of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

The support and care provided by loved ones shape who an individual is and what they eventually become. For Victor and his creation, the lack of love and support ultimately leads them to their narcissistic and melancholic feelings. This essay examines Freud's pieces on Mourning and Melancholy and On Narcissism to help understand the psychology of Victor and his creation in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Pihas
Hamm
April 28
1pm
D216

2013 Senior Essays

2013 Senior Essays and Schedule

All faculty and students are welcome to attend any of the senior essay seminars. Assigned faculty and student readers can download a copy of an essay here by clicking on its title. Click here for a schedule calendar; there will no doubt be some adjustments, so check often for updates. Please notify Tutor Jim Smith right away of any problems.

Taylor Bradshaw

Exploration of Stories: A Yarn on the Wondrous Art of Story-Telling

What makes a good story? Asking this question of Aristotle, Plato, and many well regarded story-tellers brought about an essay that is reminiscent of a journey. A journey that at first seems like an easy jaunt through the woods, but instead turns into a perilous flight through a menacing and confusing labyrinth.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Joseph Zepeda
Theo Carlile
Tues. 5/7 4:30pm
Arcade 2

Julianne Cozzetto

Exploring Moderation and Reason in Search of Happiness

As you sit there contemplating what will make you happy, consider these questions: Can happiness be connected with fulfillment? How does moderation and reason affect your happiness? Since you are contemplating the nature of happiness, does that make you happy? Join me as I explore excellence and happiness according to Aristotle and as I offer a definition that encompasses more than just the philosopher's happiness. This essay will use Leo Tolstoy and Jane Austen, in addition to Aristotle, to highlight the role that moderation and reason play in the search and attainment of a person's happiness.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Theo Carlile
---
Tues. 4/30 3pm
Arcade 02

Anthony Gotti

Futility in Tolstoyan Historicism
Historicism is commonly defined as the theory that social and cultural phenomena are defined by history. In essence, historicism is the belief that historical events are governed by laws. The purpose of this essay is to clarify Tolstoy’s ideas on history by breaking down his argument throughout his Second Epilogue in War and Peace.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Jim Smith
----
Tues. 4/30 4:30pm
Arcade 02

Alexis Hernandez

Soiled Virtue

Exploring Palto's Sophist and William Shakespeare's Othello, what is to be said about man's virtue, nature, and truth?  Taking a closer look at the characters Iago and Othello can we distinguish the philosopher from the sophist, if so can we determine which character is which?

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Jim Smith
Gratia Cobeen
Wed. 5/8 4:30pm
Arcade 02

Alexia Jarvis

It Takes Two

It takes two for great fiction to exist, the author and the reader. An argument based on Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own in relation to the author's voice and expanded with a view on the reader's ear  as applied to Emma by Jane Austen,  The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling  by Henry Fielding, and Much Ado About Nothing as well as Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:

Theo Carlile
---
Tues. 5/7 3pm
Arcade 02

Gabriel Ladd

In Search of Liberal Education

What is liberal education? What are the liberal arts? These questions are at the heart of any educational endeavor which aims at more than vocational training, but they are difficult to answer. I will attempt to find an answer with help from Aristotle, St. Thomas, and some of their peers.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Steven Cortright
---
Tues. 5/6 3pm
Arcade 02

Ryan Lee

How Contemptible a Thing Is Human Grandeur

This essay explores Swift's commentary on human nature through an analysis of the profound transformation that Gulliver undergoes throughout his four voyages. I also examine the consequences for readers of the novel as they necessarily consider the state of their own humanity in the face of Gulliver's corruption.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Jim Smith
----
Mon 5/9 3pm
Arcade 02

Sarah Marlett

On the Search for Truth with Succor from Saint Augustine

This essay examines the factors at play in St. Augustine's conversion: his intellect, habits, and friends.  With his Confessions as my guide, I attempt to find the importance of eternity in understanding truth.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Rali Christo
Joseph Zepeda
Thurs. 4/25 3pm
Arcade 02

David Mendoza

The Pursuit of Happiness

This essay is an examination of the ways which we pursue happiness, and perhaps understanding what may be the best way to do so. With the likes of Plato, Aristotle, Lao Tzu, and Henry David Thoreau offering their respective opinions on this topic, I attempt to make sense of humanity's greatest journey.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Theodore Tsukahara
---
Wed. 5/8 3pm
Arcade 02

Erendida Orellana

But Alas, at the End We All Die...

My purpose in this essay will be to demonstrate how the economic system we live in today is responsible for the flawed view that many have concerning man's human nature. In this essay I will seek to explain that being competitive or cooperative are qualities that are actually not inherent in man, but which are determined by the society we live in. Taking Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau's view on human nature, I will argue that the capitalist system as described by Karl Marx tends to bring out a competitive quality in man which cannot be said to be inherent in his nature. Overall, my purpose in this paper will be to outline how the competitive quality the capitalist system brings out in man ultimately hinders man's endeavor to survive.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Joseph Zepeda
Theo Carlile
Mon. 4/29 3pm
Arcade 02

Ian Parelius

What, then, is time?

This essay inquires into the nature of time according to St. Augustine and its implications for the human condition. It is fair to assume that most people know how to use 'time' in everyday speech. We ask each other what time it is, comment on how slow or fast the week has gone, or regret how little time we have to do all the things that must be done in our hectic lives. However, when asked about the nature of time, the question may stifle us in perplexity, or perhaps, annoyance. Is time real or substantial; or is time merely a figment of imagination, useful in measuring change and motion (the before-and-after)?

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Steven Cortright
Br. Raphael
Thurs. 5/2 3pm
Arcade 02

Alexis Reynoso

Act Naturally

This essay examines Vico's proposal of Divine Providential history and its implications on civil religion and civil morality. Rousseau's theory of natural man and Kant's metaphysics of morals are used as alternatives to Vico's Divine Providential history. Ultimately, civil morality replaces civil religion as the moralizing force in a society.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Steven Cortright
Joseph Zepeda
Wed. 4/24 3:30
Arcade 02

Kris Macias

Chimera

Nietzsche claims that one can be the master of one’s will and ruler of his own destiny. He claims that this ruler of the self, this Antinihilist, must one day come; but more importantly that their coming will be the end of suffering. As Christ came to forgive our sins before God, so must the Antinihilist come to liberate man from his own torment. The story that follows is a response to that claim.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Br. Richard Lemberg
Jim Smith
Wed. 5/1 3pm
Arcade 02

Julianne Slate

Common Differences & Differentiating Similarities: The Distinguishing Factor in Classifying Philosophical Texts

Within philosophy as a whole, the distinction between Western and Eastern philosophical thought is widely accepted as a way in which to classify philosophical texts. But what, exactly, is the fundamental difference that distinguishes a work of Western philosophy from one of Eastern philosophy? Is this distinction the only credible way in which to classify philosophy? The intention of this essay is to provide answers to these questions by comparing and contrasting Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching, and Confucius' The Analects.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Elizabeth Hamm
Theodore Tsukahara
Wed. 5/1 4:30pm
Arcade 02

2014 Senior Essays

2014 Senior Essays and Schedule

All faculty and students are welcome to attend any of the senior essay seminars. Assigned faculty and student readers can download a copy of an essay here by clicking on its title. Click here for a schedule calendar; there will no doubt be some adjustments, so check often for updates. Please notify Tutor Michael Riley right away of any problems.

Jacquelyn Antonini

The History of Democracy, a Tyrant?

What is it to govern? What is Democracy? What is American Democracy; and does American Democracy allow individuals to flourish under its rule? I confess that in this essay, I have bitten off more than I can chew and my attempt to answer these questions may prove to be unsatisfactory. However, the underlying purpose of this essay is to spark reflection, to spark discussion, and to spark a re-evaluation of held perspectives that may or may not have pre-existing biases. So, take a shot, or pour yourself a drink, get in a comfortable position (my apologies for the extended length of this paper and my gratitude to those who take the time to read it entirely) and explore the philosophical notions and practical effects of democracy in general and, more specifically, in American Democracy.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Cortright
TBD
Fri. 5/9 2:45pm
Arcade 2

Shane Blunk

Caves, Flowers, and Epistemology

There is great value in thinking about thinking. This essay explores the relationship between ourselves and the objects of our cognition through a series of metaphors found in Plato's Republic and through Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Through joint consideration, we hope to extract knowledge about our own cognition from the two thinkers.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Carlile
Pihas
Wed. 5/7 3:00pm
Arcade 02

Austin Bruer

An explanation of the nature of numbers

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
----
Wed. 3/9 1:30pm
Arcade 02

Natalie Franzini

Experience, reflection, and knowledge in War and Peace

Do we really learn from our experiences? Using Tolstoy's War & Peace this essay addresses man's search for truth and man's tendency to not understand the world around them. Man lives in a world of ideals, but what happens when these ideals do not align with reality?

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Cortright
Doval
Wed. 3/9 3:00pm
Arcade 02

Jeanne Marie Garcia

Faust in Eden

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:

Riley
---
Tues. 3/8 4:15pm
Arcade 02

Omar Hernandez

The Origins of Govervment

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Tsukahara
TBD
Wed. 5/14 1:30pm
Arcade 02

Somel Jammu

Erotic Love: Moderation through Plato and the Kama Sutra

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Hamm
Doval
Fri. 5/2 2:45pm
Arcade 02

Dolan Kay

The Art of the Muses: Its Beauty, Power, and Excellence

What power does music have over the soul?  To say that a song or piece of music moves our souls, what does this mean?  How does it do so?  This essay aims to explore the nature of music – its definition, characteristics, and impact.  The paper attempts to answer the previous questions using a variety of works including Plato’s Republic and two plays written by William Shakespeare, namely Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Carlile
Br. Raphael/Cortright
Fri. 5/2 4:00pm
Arcade 02

Onna-Lisa Kyom

For Cordelia: An Epistolary response to Kierkegaard's The Seducer's Diary from a young Diana

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Cortright/Carlile
TBD
Fri. 4/25 2:45pm
Arcade 02

Gabriela Michel

Portraits of the Soul

This essay gives a comparative analysis of the arguments and images used in the Upanishads, Plato's Phaedrus and Republic, Aristotle's On the Soul and Ethics, and Freud's Introductory Lectures of Psychoanalysis to discuss the tripartite theories regarding the Atman, ψυχή, and psyche.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Smith
TBD
Wed. 5/14 3:30pm
Arcade 02

Lucas Nemeth

Becoming Free

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Time:
Location:
Martinez
TBD
Fri. 5/16 2:30pm
Arcade 02

Shannon O'Leary

Translation and Hidden Symbolism in Literature
Translating texts from one language to another is extremely challenging, especially when the form of the languages differ. Greek, an alphabetical language, and Japanese, a pictorial language, are excellent examples of this challenge. The Greek language is suited toward ideas and concepts and can be translated into English more easily than Japanese, which is more symbolic in nature. Though main ideas can get across when translating pictorial languages, often the finer details are lost.
Advisor:
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Tsukahara
TBD
Tues. 4/22 3:30pm
Arcade 02

Lucas Shimizu

Philosophical Reflections on America's Founding Charter

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Tsukahara
TBD
Wed. 4/30 3:30pm
Arcade 02

Michael Sumner

Fear and loathing in the Peloponnesus

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Tsukahara
TBD
Tues. 5/13 3:30
Arcade 02