Spring 2017 Senior Essays and Schedule

2017 Senior Essays and Schedule

All faculty and students are welcome to attend any of the senior essay seminars. Assigned faculty and student readers can download a copy of an essay (when they become available) here by clicking on its title.

Click here for a schedule calendar; there will no doubt be some adjustments, so check often for updates. Please notify Tutor Felicia Martinez right away of any problems.

Jack
Brook

Don Quixote's Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
( Cervantes, James, Pascal)
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Martinez
Riley
May 9
3pm
D203
Cirenna
Dao
The Waiting Game. The Connection Between Human Nature and Faith.
(Pascal and Montaigne)
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Hamm
TBD
May 17
1pm
D203
Jack
Iles

Education, Sophistry, and the Polis, according to Plato and Hume

(Hume and Plato)

A thesis in which Iles tries to subtly––or not so subtly, depending on your reading––push his political agenda by placing traditional values and education over both positivism and deconstructionism by accusing the two of being silly sophistry; all the while trying to avoid explicit names and examples, but instead relying on two smart dead people to give weight to his argument, while also trying to avoid falling into casual nationalism

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Cardwell
Zepeda
April 25
3pm
D203
Nicholas
Johnson

The Legacy of Euclid

 

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Smith
Hamm
April 19
1pm
D203
Alejandro
Kerrigan
Rousseau
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Tsukahara
TBD
May19
1pm
D216
John
Konevich
Rousseau and Hobbes
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
TBD
TBD
May 5
1pm
D216
Dustin
Linck

On the Origin of Resolutions: An essay concerning the evolution of labor, and our American labor consciousness--individual and social

A proper analysis--of our ignorant, consumptive policies, of our purpose (or excuse) for having them, and, ultimately, of the development of our consciousness--has shown the need for original, conscious synthesis: of freedom and liberty, the reason for them, the virtue in them, and, most certainly, of our expenditures of energy. Further, since this analysis has naturally presupposed a certain need that we have categorically ignored, we know that this ignorance keeps us from successfully struggling with our problems together, i.e. ignorance keeps us from consciously synthesizing together our individual analyses. If we could remember this fact, then this would be a relative, synthetic resolution (found in future conversations) of our American problems.

"I highly recommend watching Michael Pollan's Cooked on Netflix before 1pm on May 3rd, 2017"

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
May 3
1pm
D203
James
Maynard
(“The most exciting thesis ever, come because you’ll be so super excited” -Rhetoric)

(Darwin, Nietzsche, and Freud)

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Zepeda
TBD
May 12
1pm
D216
Alexander
Otto

Phaedrus: The Soul Discovering Truth

Mr. Otto covers the story of the Phaedrus and the purpose of myth in reality. The myth in question is the chariot, and this represents the soul, the origin of the soul, and the spiritual fulfillment of the soul.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Riley
TBD
May 2
3pm
D203
Gabrielle
Patterson
“I Kant Believe It’s Not Science!”: An Attempted Explanation of the Metaphysician’s Self-Abuse
Every few years, a senior is stupid enough to write on Kant. This year, I am that senior. Everybody is likely thinking one of two things.
1: I hate Kant and I barely understood what he was saying when I read the Critique of Pure Reason, so there is no chance that I am going to that seminar.
2. I've never read Kant and have only heard scary things about him, so I am for sure going to avoid that thesis.
To these perfectly justified thoughts, I only issue a disclaimer: My mom, who has never read Kant, or anything like him, read my thesis and was able to understand it. So don't be afraid! I wrote it so that everybody can and should be able to read and understand it.
Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Cortright
Hamm
May 10
1pm
D203
Andrew
Penman
"Emperors In Mirrors Are Smaller Than They Appear"

Is Tolstoy correct in asserting that "a king is history's slave?" Is he right about how history works?

Tolstoy’s War and Peace

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Riley
Smith
April 21
1pm
D216
Kathryn
Price
Could We Be Wrong? An Exploration into Mathematical Truths, First Principles, Where We Were Wrong, and How We Could Be Wrong Again.

The Great Books Program incorporates mathematical and scientific theories from a wide variety of marvelous thinkers, some of which contradict. From Ptolemy to Copernicus to Newton to Einstein, there seems to be an ever changing understanding of our world and reality. But what if our discovery is not yet finished when it comes to our comprehension of mathematics and physics? Could we be wrong about concepts we believe to be evident? These are the questions considered in this thesis. So if an exploration into mathematical truth sounds like a good read, you’ve come to the right place. And if not, still read it.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Smith
Martinez
May 16
3pm
D203
Dimitri
Quaglierini

“On Becoming a Monster: A Psychoanalytic Understanding of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

The support and care provided by loved ones shape who an individual is and what they eventually become. For Victor and his creation, the lack of love and support ultimately leads them to their narcissistic and melancholic feelings. This essay examines Freud's pieces on Mourning and Melancholy and On Narcissism to help understand the psychology of Victor and his creation in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Advisor:
Faculty Reader:
Date:
Time:
Location:
Pihas
Martinez
April 28
1pm
D216